Book Site Inspection
or call   1300 004 889
or call   1300 004 889
Book Site Inspection
or call   1300 004 889
or call   1300 004 889

Description

Rippon Lea is an outstanding late-19th century urban estate. The ornate mansion was built in the affluent 'Boom' or 'Victorian Italianate' style. It was designed by Joseph Reed, Melbourne's most important architect of the time, and included a sophisticated system for water self-sufficiency that sustained the magnificent gardens.The estate has been open to the...

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Rippon Lea is an outstanding late-19th century urban estate. The ornate mansion was built in the affluent 'Boom' or 'Victorian Italianate' style. It was designed by Joseph Reed, Melbourne's most important architect of the time, and included a sophisticated system for water self-sufficiency that sustained the magnificent gardens.The estate has been open to the public for over 30 years. It is a popular venue for functions and picnics, and offers an educational program for students.

The ground floor consisted of the drawing and dining rooms, a study and breakfast room. An unusual design feature was an outdoor pavilion or piazza adjacent to the dining room. On the first floor were six bedrooms, a dressing room, a nursery, an earth closet and, also remarkable for the time, two bathrooms.

In an adjacent single storey wing was a gunroom, a maid's room and a day nursery for Sargood's 12 children. The service rooms were all in the basement, uncommon in 19th-century Australia, and the area around these was excavated to provide natural light.Sargood made substantial alterations and additions to Rippon Lea, reflecting his increased wealth, from 1882 until 1903. Although he used different architects over the 30-year period, the style used was unusually consistent.

Rippon Lea was sold by Sargood's widow after his death in 1903. The property then passed into the hands of a succession of wealthy Melbourne families, who altered the house and garden in ways that demonstrate the extravagant lifestyles of wealthy society of the period.

Today Rippon Lea House is in a very good condition. The form of the main part of the house is largely as it was in the 19th century, and adjoining it is the intact 1930s ballroom and pool complex. The dining room was redecorated in the 1930s and is intact from this period. Since 1972 the National Trust has reinstated the drawing room to its 1930s appearance, redecorated the nursery and a first floor bedroom, changed a bedroom into an art gallery and installed a new kitchen on the ground floor.

The estate has been open to the public for over 30 years. It is a popular function venue and picnic spot, and offers a respected educational program for students.

Facilities

Air Conditioning .glyphicons-heat
Audio Visual .glyphicons-projector
Disabled Access .glyphicons-person-wheelchair
Internet Access .glyphicons-globe
Outdoor Area .glyphicons-tree-deciduous
Parking Available .glyphicons-cars
Playground .glyphicons-shoe-steps
Wheelchair Access .glyphicons-person-wheelchair
Wifi Access .glyphicons-wifi

Event Rooms

The Ballroom

Min 50 people, Max 250 people

The Drawing Room

Min 20 people, Max 50 people

The Central Lawn

Min 10 people, Max 200 people

The Western Lawn

Min 10 people, Max 200 people

Under the Elms & The Lake

Min 10 people, Max 90 people

The Cedar Lawn

Min 10 people, Max 150 people

Event Room Layouts

Theatre
Classroom
U-Shape
Cabaret
Boardroom
Banquet
Cocktail
Hollow Square
The Ballroom
-
-
50
-
-
200
250
-
The Drawing Room
-
-
20
-
-
50
30
-
The Central Lawn
-
-
-
-
-
200
200
-
The Western Lawn
-
-
-
-
-
-
200
-
Under the Elms & The Lake
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
The Cedar Lawn
-
-
-
-
-
150
-
-
Theatre
Classroom
U-Shape
Cabaret
Boardroom
Banquet
Cocktail
Hollow Square
The Ballroom
-
-
50
-
-
200
250
-
The Drawing Room
-
-
20
-
-
50
30
-
The Central Lawn
-
-
-
-
-
200
200
-
The Western Lawn
-
-
-
-
-
-
200
-
Under the Elms & The Lake
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
The Cedar Lawn
-
-
-
-
-
150
-
-